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Our blog

Tutor trouble-shooting: common problems and how to deal with them


You know the old saying, ‘if it was easy, everyone would do it’. Well, tutoring is a bit like that, and as rewarding as it can be, there will always be challenges to overcome along the way. At ClassHub, we understand that, so we’ve put together the five most common problems tutors have, along with some tips for solving them.

  1. Pushy parents

When mums and dads come across as a bit ‘helicopter’ (in other words, constantly hovering overhead!), it’s often just because they want to have more involvement or control. But the downside is that this can make the child feel pressured. The key here is to get the parents in on the act as much as possible, and give them activities to work on with the child in between your sessions. That way, they’ll feel included on the journey, and will often be less inclined to over-involve themselves during your sessions.

  1. Badly behaved children or laziness

A badly behaved child is a rite of passage for a tutor. But reasons for it can vary between children, so the starting point should always be with the parents, as they will often know the root of the issue. When it comes to laziness, using rewards often works well to kick-start self motivation. For example, use the incentive of a fun activity once a piece of work is completed during your session: the idea is of course that soon a sense of achievement will be enough. And it’s always worth remembering that it can be hard for children to motivate themselves for additional studying after a day at school, so be patient. 

  1. Sourcing enough tutoring ‘gigs’

Tutoring is often a seasonal activity, but there are plenty of students who need support all year round. Having said that, maintaining a steady stream of work can be a challenge. That’s where ClassHub comes in. We do the promotion for you and make it easy for you to be found by parents - and it’s quick and easy to list the classes you teach, and get booked up and paid online. You choose when and how you teach to fit in with your life, so you’re in control too.

  1. Working on your own

Many tutors are also teachers, but for those who only tutor, you may miss having colleagues to work with. Even though part of your working week is spent with students, there’s a lot of background work to be done, such as preparing lessons, marking work or doing your own administration: and all of this is likely to be on your own. One solution to this is to make sure you have adult interaction during the day, whether that’s working in a cafe or meeting friends. Having a structured day helps too - getting up and ready as if you’re going to work can help with feelings of demotivation. 

  1. Not knowing the answer

You’re a tutor - but you’re not an all knowing, all powerful being, and we get that. So now and again, you will not know the answer to the question your student is asking you. This is totally normal and our advice would be not to try and cover up for this. Instead, tell the student that you don’t know, and will get back to them, either by email or at the next tutorial. Then, start the following tutorial by reminding your student what the question was, and then work through the answer. Alternatively, you could challenge the student to find out too, and both come together with your answers in the next session. 

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